She is to the art world what David Attenborough is to nature: a worthy guide with both a macro and micro vision, fluent in her chosen tongue and always full of empathy and awe.’, ‘An incivisive meditation on the value of heartfelt, messy art in our paranoid times. It’s why I read her.’  James Lasdun, author of Afternoon of a Faun, ‘A warm, thinking, enticing sweep of a book, like spending the afternoon with your brainiest friend.’ Kate Mosse, author of The Burning Chamber. Her way with words is otherworldly and all her books dwell into the realm of arts - which is both an education and a source of questioning. I love the way that Laing combines literary biography and personal memoir to create an exciting fresh art form. When Olivia Laing began her collection of essays, Funny Weather: Art in an Emergency, she had no idea just how relevant it would be. Today we are living in a terrifying world, where there's a sense that freedoms are being curtailed and policies are being made to shutter the rights many have worked to secure for so long. It was a book of the year in the Evening Standard, Independent and Financial Times and was shortlisted for the 2012 Ondaatje Prize and the Dolman Travel Book of the Year. I enjoyed it. Laing argues that it can. Her work is guided always by a love of human nature and an optimistic outlook on how that nature can overcome. I ❤️ Olivia Laing. And those very same talents are on display again in Funny Weather, a magnificent collection of essays that, together, ask fundamental questions about life and art. Funny Weather brings together a career’s worth of Laing’s writing about art and culture, examining its role in our political and emotional lives. It makes plain inequalities, and it offers other ways of living.”, “Empathy is not something that happens to us when we read Dickens. We've got you covered with the buzziest new releases of the day. This article is published as part of our #CultureIsNotCancelled campaign: In the winter of 2015, the art magazine Frieze asked British writer and critic Olivia Laing to write a regular column. Just a moment while we sign you in to your Goodreads account. In this remarkable, inspiring collection of essays, acclaimed writer and critic Olivia Laing makes a brilliant case for why art matters, especially in the turbulent political weather of the twenty-first century. Be the first to ask a question about Funny Weather. Her first book, To the River (2011) is the story of a midsummer journey down the river Virginia Woolf drowned in. Olivia Laing makes me want to read books, watch films, look at art, research the lives of others and continually uncover the ways in which human beings have created beauty and beautiful ugliness. W. hen Olivia Laing began her collection of essays, Funny Weather: Art in an Emergency, she had no idea just how relevant it would be. In a minute of synchronicity, I read an essay about the garden and Derek Jarman just before I started reading Olivia Laing's Funny Weather, and to read about her 'overspill of tenderness' towards him was so lovely. Funny Weather brings together a career’s worth of Laing’s writing about art and culture, examining its role in our political and emotional lives. Start by marking “Funny Weather: Art in an Emergency” as Want to Read: Error rating book. But I think it can. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. “Is art resistance? She is to the art world what David Attenborough is to nature: a worthy guide with both a macro and micro vision, fluent in her chosen tongue and always full of empathy and awe.’ Irish Times, ‘An incivisive meditation on the value of heartfelt, messy art in our paranoid times.' In the wake of George Floyd’s death, another painful reminder of persisting police brutality against Black lives, an outpouring of collective rage and grief has led to protests across the country. Olivia Laing makes me want to read books, watch films, look at art, research the lives of others and continually uncover the ways in which human beings have created beauty and beautiful ugliness. Laing shares her thoughts about memorable artists as well as her reviews of books and writers. More importantly, I am a major Olivia Laing fan girl. To create our... To see what your friends thought of this book. Also the chapters on Hilary Mantel and Ali Smith interested me, and some essays here and there. She describes her work as “cheerless, miserable books”, and yet even when dealing with the darkest of themes, she lets in the light. I particularly loved reading about the artists in relation to the AIDS crisis that Laing writes in the book. Being a collection of work its an eclectic mix of writing, some better than others. Olivia Laing’s The Lonely City remains one of the most affecting non-fiction books I have read. Funny Weather celebrates art as an antidote to a frightening political time. This is yet another “art book” that really ought to have spent more time actually talking about art, but I enjoyed Laing’s musings regardless of that. Two disclaimers. Olivia Laing's essay collection, 'Funny Weather: Art in an Emergency' examines the role art plays in the midst of social, political and environmental crises. What art does is provide material with which to think: new registers, new spaces. In biographical sketches she chose some I had never heard; such as Rachel Kneebone. I wasn’t familiar with that many of the artists profiled in this collection of previously published essays, so I spent a lot of time on the internet while reading this book in order to familiarize myself with them. Olivia is a formidable essayist and art critic and she combined both these skills to craft a tender insight into loneliness through the excavation of the lives and experiences of famous lonely artists who have lived and worked in New York City. Funny Weather is the perfect read for this moment. She profiles Jean-Michel Basquiat and Georgia O’Keeffe, interviews Hilary Mantel and Ali Smith, writes love letters to David Bowie and Wolfgang Tillmans, and explores loneliness and technology, women and alcohol, sex and the body. It was interesting. Olivia Laing’s ‘Funny Weather’ ponders the role of art during times of crisis. About art, love, literature, and more. There is something so personal about these short glimpses into what or who authors chose to write. I received this book from the publisher, via Netgalley, in exchange for an honest review. ‘Never has a publication been more timely’, ‘Frankly, it's essential to read anything Laing writes.’, ‘Laing has acted as a kind of cultural sage for the past four years, an accidental literary grande dame of the emotional havoc wrought by late capitalism and digital disconnect.’, ‘A thought-provoking, inspiring collection that you can go back to whenever the weather takes a funny turn.’, gives the reader a tangible sense of the sprawling garden of work which Laing has planted. In these Laing gives us a glimpse into the lives of some important artists, writers and singers of the 20th century. ), Amazon, Waterstones signed copies (international delivery), Buy in the US: Indiebound, Barnes & Noble, Amazon, Read: extract in Guardian, profile in New York Magazine, interviews in Bomb, AnOther Magazine, PEN, Garage, London Review Bookshop, feature in Dazed, Listen: Monocle, Start the Week, Great Women Artists, LA Review of Books, Watch: in conversation at the Center for Fiction, ‘Frankly, it's essential to read anything Laing writes.’ The Bookseller, ‘Laing has acted as a kind of cultural sage for the past four years, an accidental literary grande dame of the emotional havoc wrought by late capitalism and digital disconnect.’ New York Magazine, ‘A thought-provoking, inspiring collection that you can go back to whenever the weather takes a funny turn.’ Evening Standard, ‘Funny Weather gives the reader a tangible sense of the sprawling garden of work which Laing has planted. She profiles Jean-Michel Basquiat and Georgia O'Keeffe, interviews Hilary Mantel and Ali Smith, writes love letters to David Bowie and Wolfgang Tillmans, and explores loneliness and technology, women and alcohol, sex and the body. She profiles Jean-Michel Basquiat and Georgia O’Keefe, interviews Hilary Mantel and Ali Smith, writes love letters to David Bowie and Freddie Mercury, and explores loneliness and technology, women and alcohol, sex and the body. Forever hopeful in the face of the horrific political climates, Laing shows us ways in which resistance can flourish, and freedom can prevail. This was a very interesting entertainment though during the long wait for. Steiner's way, according to her, is a form of escapism, a shirking of duty: art cannot not reorganise our critical and moral faculties without our will and consent; what art does is provide one with new perspectives, different sets of. Funny Weather urges us to humanise art, and listen to what artists say about life, love and crisis. I love Olivia Laing. Refresh and try again. Funny Weather brings together a career’s worth of Laing’s writing about art and culture, and their role in our political and emotional lives. Olivia Laing worries about these changes and holds up art as a remedy for these troubles. Olivia Laing’s Funny Weather: Art in an Emergency (Picador) is a timely book, though not in the sense we usually understand the word.It is, as its subtitle has it, a work about art in an emergency, which at first glance summons the urgency we are now constantly enjoined with when people speak of the crises of the present and those still to come. Full disclosure: I won a free ARC of this book in a Goodreads giveaway. It depends how you think about time. The best part was it gifted me a long list of artists, filmmakers, and writers to dive into during quarantine. Can you plant a garden to stop a war? Olivia Laing begs to differ. by Olivia Laing ‧ RELEASE DATE: May 12, 2020 A stellar collection of essays and reviews from the award-winning London-based writer. ', ‘I yield to absolutely no one in my admiration of Olivia Laing; her essays are magical liberations of words and ideas, art and love; they're the essence of great 21st century literature: brilliantly expressed, wildly uncontained, wilful and wonderfully unbound.’ Philip Hoare, author of, ‘Like all great critics, Olivia Laing combines formidable intelligence with boundless curiosity and fabulous taste, but she also has a rare quality of intimacy; an ability to connect the reader to a work of art or literature (or for that matter a facet of life itself) with a directness that lights it up like nothing else. Funny Weather by Olivia Laing. Funny Weather: Art in an Emergency is Olivia Laing's response to - and takes its title from her name for - the strange, unsettling political climate of the past few years since Trump's inauguration. She chose the title ‘Funny Weather’. What we do with these new registers and spaces, she says, is up to us. Consistently, Laing’s essays are urgent, compassionate, enlivening and acutely perceptive, and that’s true whether or not we encounter them “in an emergency”. Funny Weather by Olivia Laing. I love the way that Laing combines literary biography and personal memoir to create an exciting fresh art form. this is not a deep dive into one subject matter, but a thrilling exploration of a multitude. While chronic illness and complex medical conditions have been indisputably good practice for coping with uncertainty and restrictions during a pandemic, they have also had a significant downside, and that is: with medical offices and services shut down to restrict the spread of covid, our own medical conditions have become harder to manage. Olivia Laing is the author of four works of nonfiction, including The Lonely City and Funny Weather, and a novel, Crudo, which won the James Tait Black Memorial Prize.A recipient of the 2018 Windham-Campbell Prize for nonfiction, she lives in London. Steiner's way, according to her, is a form of escapism, a shirking of duty: art cannot not reorganise our critical and moral faculties without our will and consent; what art does is provide one with new perspectives, different sets of eyes to look at the world with. After that, friend, it's up to you." By John Glassie. A recipient of the 2018 Windham-Campbell Prize for nonfiction, she lives in London. Olivia Laing begs to differ. Telegraph, ‘The hospitality of world view in Olivia’s writing is a vital force in our disputatious present.’ Maria Balshaw, director of Tate, ‘I yield to absolutely no one in my admiration of Olivia Laing; her essays are magical liberations of words and ideas, art and love; they're the essence of great 21st century literature: brilliantly expressed, wildly uncontained, wilful and wonderfully unbound.’ Philip Hoare, author of RISINGTIDEFALLINGSTAR, ‘Like all great critics, Olivia Laing combines formidable intelligence with boundless curiosity and fabulous taste, but she also has a rare quality of intimacy; an ability to connect the reader to a work of art or literature (or for that matter a facet of life itself) with a directness that lights it up like nothing else. An interesting concept and an enjoyable collection, yet some pieces didn’t really do it for me. We’d love your help. It's work. It also shows the importance of art - especially now. by W. W. Norton Company. I loved it. After that, friend, it's up to you.”, The Lonely City: Adventures in the Art of Being Alone. -- Charlie Porter I yield to absolutely no one in my admiration of Olivia Laing; her essays are magical liberations of words and ideas, art and love; they're the essence of great 21st century literature: brilliantly expressed, wildly uncontained, wilful and wonderfully unbound. May 12th 2020 She profiles Jean-Michel Basquiat and Georgia O’Keefe, interviews Hilary Mantel and Ali Smith, writes love letters to David Bowie and Freddie Mercury, and explores loneliness and technology, women and alcohol, sex and the body. In Case of Emergency, Read Olivia Laing From The Lonely City to Funny Weather, the author writes to find a path forward through pain. In this remarkable, inspiring collection of essays, Olivia Laing makes a brilliant case for why art matters, especially in the turbulent political weather of the 21st century. A few years back I started reading and fell in love with essays. It’s why I read her.’  James Lasdun, author of, ‘A warm, thinking, enticing sweep of a book, like spending the afternoon with your brainiest friend.’, in conversation at the Center for Fiction. Worth **** stars, but I cannot but long for Laings thorough researched and superbly elaborated longer works of non-fiction. Theres a little anecdote in the beginning about how we read now -- looking for the poison rather than the nourishment, reading to confirm our values and suspicions rather than to rest in a different space -- a special thought for a book of criticism, in a time where that is so loaded. Funny Weather is a collection of Olivia Laing's essays. Olivia Laing is a writer and critic. fascinated by the way Laing intertwines the lives and works of a wide range of artists with her own personal experiences. George Steiner once stated that the commander of a concentration camp could read Goethe and Rilke in the evening and still carry out his duties at Auschwitz the next day, proof that art has failed its most important purpose—to humanise. I won an Advanced Reader Copy of this book in a Goodreads Giveaway. This book both inspired me and made me incredibly jealous (that I missed all the details the Laing writes about). Olivia Laing makes me want to write; makes me realise that opinions and individual ways of seeing are important and interesting. Funny Weather urges us to humanise art, and listen to what artists say about life, love and crisis. It feels almost serendipitous that Olivia Laing’s essay collection Funny Weather: Art in an Emergency has been published during a global pandemic. It depends what you think a seed does, if it’s tossed into fertile soil.”. I loved this book so much! And those very same talents are on display again in Funny Weather, a magnificent collection of essays that, together, ask fundamental questions about life and. Share Facebook Tweet Email Shares 516 "Funny Weather: Art in an Emergency" by Olivia Laing is a well-timed exploration of the ways in which art can heal an ailing world. In this remarkable, inspiring collection of essays, acclaimed writer and critic Olivia Laing makes a brilliant case for why art matters, especially in the turbulent political weather of the twenty first century. It comfortingly addresses the surreal, evil weirdness of the current administration, and often just felt like you were having a conversation with a very smart, empathetic friend. Ardent and inspiring, Funny Weather is a paean to the personal and societal significance of art in our lives from the prize-winning author of The Lonely City and Crudo.In this sparkling collection of a career’s worth of writings, Laing discusses the many faces and forms of art as a veritable antidote to the frailty, falsity and flux of the political climate we live in. Funny Weather: Art in in an Emergency (W. W. Norton & Company, 2020) by Olivia Laing is available on Bookshop starting May 12. Browse The Guardian Bookshop for a big selection of Society & culture: general books and the latest book reviews from The Gua Buy Funny Weather 9781529027655 by Olivia Laing for only £9.29 What are does is provide material with which to think: new registers, new spaces. Funny Weather is a collection Of Olivia Laing's essays, columns and profiles, I was intrigued that she seemed to be given the position of Deputy Literary Editor of the Guardian so easily. John … She is such an acute, brilliant writer and I've got a list full of wonderful books, essays and artwork that I need to explore after reading it. George Steiner once stated that the commander of a concentration camp could read Goethe and Rilke in the evening and still carry out his duties at Auschwitz the next day, proof that art has failed its most important purpose—to humanise.
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