But thou art he that took me out of the womb] When, but for thine almighty midwifery, I might have been strangled; or, as an untimely birth, never seen the sun. "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". 1840-57. 1983-1999. The Jewish Sages contemplate Psalm 22. Psalm 71:6), that from the womb onwards Jahve was his God, there is also more in it than the purely objective idea, that he grew up into such a relationship to God. batah. App-69. 1865-1868. 1999. God's creatures have always a claim upon him from the very fact that they are his creatures. BibliographyGill, John. But this is applicable to Christ in a singular manner, not as a late learned writer takes it, that God separated him from the womb, but that God did bring him out (as the word properly signifies). BibliographyPoole, Matthew, "Commentary on Psalms 22:9". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". 9. BibliographyCoffman, James Burton. New International Version (NIV) דוְאַתָּ֥ה קָד֑וֹשׁ י֜וֹשֵׁ֗ב תְּהִלּ֥וֹת יִשְׂרָאֵֽל: But You are holy: … His first breathings were those of piety. For example, David's hands and feet were never "pierced" (Psalm 22:16), and nobody "cast lots" (Psalm 22:18) for David's clothes. 22:10 I was cast upon thee from the womb: thou art my God from my mother's belly. And it is the Holy Spirit who teaches the faithful the wisdom to collect together, when they are brought into circumstances of fear and trouble, the evidences of the goodness of God, in order thereby to sustain and strengthen their faith. Psalm 22:9, ESV: "Yet you are he who took me from the womb; you made me trust you at my mother’s breasts." thou didst make me hope when I was upon my mother's breasts; which may be understood of the expectation and hope, common to infants, which have not the use of reason, with all creatures, whose eyes wait upon the Lord, and he gives them their meat in due season; and here may regard the sudden and suitable provision of milk in the mother's breast, to which there is in the infant a natural desire, and an hope and expectation of. John Trapp Complete Commentary. His first breathings were those of piety. 9 i But You are He who took Me out of the womb; You made Me trust while on My mother's breasts. And after it is brought into the world, seeing it is subject to so many miseries, and cannot stir a finger to help itself, how could it live even for a single day, did not God take it up into his fatherly bosom to nourish and protect it? It is, therefore, with good reason said, that the infant is cast upon him; for, unless he fed the tender little babes, and watched over all the offices of the nurse, even at the very time of their being brought forth, they are exposed to a hundred deaths, by which they would be suffocated in an instant. Psalms 22:8 He trusted on the LORD that he would deliver him: let him deliver him, seeing he delighted in him. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/psalms-22.html. 2 My God, my God, why have you abandoned me?. Share. “To the choirmaster: according to The Doe of the Dawn. In a sense, this is true of all men, "But of the Holy Child, it was most true (Luke 2:40,49,52)."[8]. BibliographyHengstenberg, Ernst. 9.Surely thou. 22:10 I was cast upon thee from the womb: thou [art] my God from my mother's f belly. But thou art he that took me out of the womb] When, but for thine almighty midwifery, I might have been strangled; or, as an untimely birth, never seen the sun. Go to. This often made the words come in the wrong order, like Psalm 9: 3. [9] The torture described here is clearly that of a crucifixion, a form of execution, which, as far as we can determine, had never at that time been used by any government. What the sufferer pleads is, the abundant cause for trust which God gave Him by loving care from earliest infancy. David again here raises a new fortress, in order to withstand and repel the machinations of Satan. Another way the Jews wrote poetry was to use an acrostic. The most famous one is Psalm 119. Copyright StatementThese files are public domain. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". "Coffman Commentaries on the Old and New Testament". The term difficult. "Thou art my God since my mother bare me" (Psalms 22:10). "Commentary on Psalms 22:9". Applied to the Redeemer as a man, it means that in his earliest childhood he had trusted in God. Copyright StatementJames Burton Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/psalms-22.html. The former, it seems to me, is probably the meaning; and the idea is, that frown his earliest years he had been lea to trust in God; and he now pleads this fact as a reason why he should interpose to save him. "But thou art he that took me out of the womb; Thou didst make me trust when I was upon my mother's breasts. But if ingratitude did not put upon our eyes the veil of stupidity, we would be ravished with admiration at every childbirth in the world. The verse before us is in point of form an appendage to the last clause of the preceding one, "He has delight in him:" this is true; for Thou, O God, hast given me the richest proofs of Thy delight. Only God is left and now he senses that God himself is forsaking him. God is still his Father; and he who gave being at first, and nourished the flickering life of infancy, will not now abandon the life he gave. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/heg/psalms-22.html. Yet You are He who brought me forth from the womb; You made me trust when upon my mother's breasts. Job 10:8-11). That the necessity is near at hand, i.e., urgent, refers back antithetically to the prayer, that God would not remain afar off; no one doth, nor can help except He alone. . Copyright StatementThe New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. This is urged by the sufferer as a reason why God should now interpose and protect him. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/psalms-22.html. When I was upon my mother’s breasts, i.e. Thou hast delighted in me, for thou art He that took me out of the wombs-literally, 'Thou (art) my breaking forth from ( gochiy (Hebrew #1518)) the womb:' the effect being put for the author of it: thou are the author of my going forth from the womb. and give you support from p Zion! But thou art he that took me out of the womb - Thou hast made me; and hast guided and defended me from my earliest infancy. Borne out of a gut-wrenching anguish, Psalm 22 is the cry of one who knows what it is to be bullied by his enemies, rejected by his community, and abandoned by God.1 The threat for the psalmist is imminent as a “company of evildoers” surrounds him like bulls ready to attack and lions eager to … Continue reading "Commentary on Psalm 22" What prevents the child from perishing, as it might, a hundred times in its own corruption, before the time for bringing it forth arrives, but that God, by his secret and incomprehensible power, keeps it alive in its grave? Read Full Chapter. Thou didst make me hope, or trust, i.e. 9. Faith that turns to God in spite of derision is the best answer to derision. 1874-1909. hope = trust, or confide. (Note: The Hoph. "Commentary on Psalms 22:9". 22:9 But thou [art] he that took me out of the e womb: thou didst make me hope [when I was] upon my mother's breasts. 4 May he r grant you your heart’s desire. This sense of the words frees them from a difficulty, how the grace of hope, or of faith and confidence, can, in a proper sense, be exercised in the infant state; for though the principle of grace may be implanted so early, yet how it should be exercised when there is not the due use of reason is not easy to conceive; if, therefore, the words are taken in this sense, the meaning must be, that he was caused to hope as soon as he was capable of it, which is sometimes the design of such a phrase; see Job 31:18; unless we suppose something extraordinary in Christ's human nature, which some interpreters are not willing to allow, because he was in all things like unto us excepting sin; but I see not, that seeing the human nature was an extraordinary one, was perfectly holy from the first of it, the grace of God was upon it as soon as born, and it was anointed with the Holy Ghost above its fellows, why it may not be thought to exercise grace in an extraordinary manner, so early as is here expressed, literally understood. My God, my God, why have you forsaken me?Why are https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/psalms-22.html. Make me hope The same Hebrew verb ( mabTiychiy (Hebrew #982)) as is translated "trusted" in Psalms 22:4-5; to this Make me hope. c Thou didst make me hope.—Better, thou didst make me repose on my mother’s breast. Psalm 22 is the prayer of a suffering martyr, who suffers unto death for the sake of his people, and is about salvation and resurrection by God as an answer to prayer. 1685. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/psalms-22.html. Copyright StatementThese files are public domain.Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Here he asserts what he had before implied-namely, that God has had the same care for Him from his earliest being, and is as truly His God as He was the God of the fathers who trusted in Him (Psalms 22:4); and this is the ground of the prayer in Psalms 22:11, "Be not far from me." Used by Permission. Which may be considered either … Thou didst make me hope - Margin, "Keptest me in safety." Psalm 22:9 Yet You are He who brought me forth from the womb;You made me trust when upon my mother’s breasts. But thou art he that took me out of the womb - I owe my life to thee. His first love was the love of God. But because it is a common mercy little notice is taken or use made of it. For trust and help have always, in times past, been inseparably connected. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/psalms-22.html. His first aspirations were for the divine favor. BibliographyJamieson, Robert, D.D. He will not cast off his own child. . "Commentary on Psalms 22:9". The still obscurer expression גּוֹוִי, in the borrowed passage, Psalms 71:6, gives us no assistance. The Messiah’s work on the cross Thou didst make me hope, didst make me lie securely upon my mother’s breasts, But thou art he that took me out of the womb. Compare Isaiah 49:1-3. 2 May he send you help from o the sanctuary. The same Hebrew verb ( mabTiychiy (Hebrew #982)) as is translated "trusted" in Psalms 22:4-5; to this He refers back: translate, 'Thou didst make me (or give me cause) to trust (even as "our fathers trusted in thee" of old) when I was upon my mother's breasts.' Now, we would like to demonstrate how even our Jewish Sages recognized and admitted that Psalm 22 was a prophetic psalm about the Messiah. Ernst Hengstenberg on John, Revelation, Ecclesiastes, Ezekiel & Psalms. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. Verse 9. It may mean here either that he was made to cherish a hope of the divine favor "in very early life," as it were when an infant at the breast; or it may mean that he had cause then to hope, or to trust in God. He says that from the very moment of his birth he was in fellowship with God. Psalm 22:9, KJV: "But thou art he that took me out of the womb: thou didst make me hope when I was upon my mother's breasts." A Psalm of David. 21. Psalms 22:10 I was cast upon thee from the … He has already shown Himself as such in his helpless infancy. 1871-8. Thou didst make me hope.—Better, thou didst make me repose on my mother’s breast. Psalm 22:9 Translation & Meaning. didst make me hope—literally, "made me secure.". Psalm 22:9 Why Have You Forsaken Me? And although this be a mercy which God grants to all mankind, yet it may well be alleged here, partly in way of gratitude for this great, though common, mercy; nething being more reasonable and usual than for David and other holy men to praise God for such blessings; and partly as an argument to encourage himself to expect and to prevail with God, to grant him the deliverance which now he desires, because he had formerly delivered him; this being a very common argument: see 1 Samuel 17:37 2 Corinthians 1:10. The argument is given Matthew 6:25. "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". We ought to regard it as an established principle, that as God never wearies in the exercise of his liberality, and as the most exuberant bestowment cannot exhaust his riches, it follows that, as we have experienced him to be a father from our earliest infancy, he will show himself the same towards us even to extreme old age. God may be called "the breaking forth," because it was by His power alone this took place, just as He is in other places called the covenant, the salvation, the blessing, the joy, etc., because all these depend on Him. No one can prove that these thoughts did not pass through the mind of the Redeemer when he was enduring the agonies of desertion on the cross; no one can show that they would have been improper. Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers, Keil and Delitzsch Biblical Commentary on the Old Testament. His disciples and family have left him alone; all have gone. "Commentary on Psalms 22:9". this grace was most gloriously manifested. "The Adam Clarke Commentary". His mockers had taunted Him, as if His present misery showed the emptiness of the saying that God "delighted in Him" (Psalms 22:8). He takes as a blessed truth what they had spoken as an ironical sneer. Psalm 22:9 Parallel Verses [⇓ See commentary ⇓] Psalm 22:9, NIV: "Yet you brought me out of the womb; you made me trust in you, even at my mother's breast." The words may be rendered, as they are by some, "thou didst keep me in safety", or make me safe and secureF26מבטיחי "tu me tutum fecisti", Cocceius; so Michaelis. God took the nation up from its political infancy (Ezekiel 16:1-63; Hosea 11:1); and delivered it out of Egypt, even as He delivered the Antitype, Messiah out of the same land (Matthew 2:13-15). BibliographyWhedon, Daniel. "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". BibliographyTrapp, John. has o, not u, perhaps in a more neuter sense, more closely approximating the reflexive (cf. Great Jewish commentators like Rashi understood that in this chapter David is not only speaking about himself, but about the coming Messiah. Thus shall we, when brought into trouble, be led to think (as we are commanded to do) on the days of happiness gone by: when distress and suffering are upon us, we shall remember the great grace and goodness of God manifested to us in early youth; and when we suffer as men, we shall reflect on what we enjoyed when children. BibliographyClarke, Adam. Use this table to get a word-for-word translation of the original Hebrew Scripture. No one can prove that these thoughts did not pass through the mind of the Redeemer when he was enduring the agonies of desertion on the cross; no one can show that they would have been improper. "Commentary on Psalms 22:9". 1905. Psalms 22:9 But thou art he that took me out of the womb: thou didst make me hope when I was upon my mother's breasts. He was a man, with all the innocent propensities and feelings of a man; and no one can say but that when on the cross - and perhaps with special fitness we may say when he saw his mother standing near him John 19:25 - these thoughts may have passed through his mind. John Trapp Complete Commentary. In fact, Rashi explains verse 27 as referring: “To the time of redemption, to the days of the Messiah.” [Rashi’s commentary on Psalm 22:27] "Commentary on Psalms 22:9". What does this verse really mean? “From the depths of the earth”: Not actual resurrection, but rescue from near-death conditions and renewal of life’s strength and meaning. "Commentary on Psalms 22:9". The Papists affirm, that there was something miraculous in the manner of Christ's coming into the world, as well as in his conception; that his conception of a virgin was miraculous is certain, being entirely owing to the wonderful and mysterious overshadowing of the Holy Ghost, and which was necessary to preserve his human nature from the contagion of sin, common to all that descend from Adam by ordinary generation; that so that individual of human nature might be proper to be united to the Son of God, and that it might be a fit sacrifice for the sins of men; but otherwise in all other things, sin only excepted, he was made like unto us; and it is a clear case, that his mother bore him the usual time, and went with him her full time of nine months, as women commonly do; see Luke 1:56; and it is as evident that he was born and brought forth in the same manner other infants are, seeing he was presented, to the Lord in the temple, and the offering was brought for him according to the law respecting the male that opens the womb, Luke 2:22; and the phrase that is here used is expressive of the common providence of God which attends such an event, every man being as it were midwifed into the world by God himself; see Job 10:18; though there was, no doubt, a peculiar providence which attended the birth of our Lord, and makes this expression more peculiarly applicable to him; since his mother Mary, when her full time was come, was at a distance from the place of her residence, was in an inn, and in a stable there, there being no room for her in the inn, and so very probably had no women about her to assist her, nor any midwife with her; and there was the more visible appearance of the hand of God in this affair, who might truly be said to take him out of the womb: thou didst make me hope when I was upon my mother's breasts; which may be understood of the expectation and hope, common to infants, which have not the use of reason, with all creatures, whose eyes wait upon the Lord, and he gives them their meat in due season; and here may regard the sudden and suitable provision of milk in the mother's breast, to which there is in the infant a natural desire, and an hope and expectation of. Although thoughts such as these may appear childish, effeminate, and unseasonable, for those who are in such pain and conflicts, yet experience here teaches us to remember these tender, cheerful, lovely works of God, to seek a place of refuge when suffering the hard bites of the wrath and of the rod of God, and to enjoy the sweet and pleasant milk of our mother's heart, and all these other acts of mercy which were shown during the years of infancy. The phrase in the Hebrew means, Thou didst cause me to trust or to hope. His first love was the love of God. "Trouble is near; there is none to help" (Psalms 22:11).
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